Dr. Inderpal Randhawa

Randhawa_Dr_Inderpal

Dr. Inderpal Randhawa

Who is Dr. Randhawa?

Dr. Inderpal Randhawa is a leading specialist in internal medicine, pediatrics, immunology, allergy and pulmonology and has been successfully treating food allergy patients with food immunotherapy for over 10 years. Dr. Randhawa has successfully treated patients with allergy to milk, eggs, wheat, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, seeds, fish and shellfish. He has implemented a unique, comprehensive, and research-driven approach to food allergy diagnosis and treatment. Since its inception,  he has nearly a decade of experience in OIT and have achieved an unmatched 99% success rate. Its nearly 1,500 OIT patients have achieved larger maintenance doses than those following other protocols, including more than hundreds of peanut graduates safely eating at least 60 peanuts daily. Safety is the hallmark of his program and he has completed over 6,000 successful food challenges.

Dr. Randhawa is currently the Director of the Gallegos Food Allergy Center at Miller Children’s Hospital. The Gallegos family specifically sought out Dr. Randhawa, who treated their own food-allergic son with food immunotherapy, to lead the Food Allergy Center which they created and funded. This bears testament to the fact that Dr. Randhawa is the one of the best doctors in this field.

Dr. Randhawa holds two academic appointments at the University of California Irvine and UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Randhawa has published over 150 peer reviewed abstracts and articles spanning the fields of immunology, pulmonology and allergy. He is the program director and research coordinator of two nationally recognized training programs in allergy, immunology and pediatric pulmonology. Dr. Randhawa has served as primary investigator in over 25 clinical trials to date.

Dr. Randhawa has an amazing team of nurses who are dedicated to this mission of improving the quality of life of his patients by alleviating one allergy at a time.

Education & Training

  • University of California Irvine
  • Long Beach Memorial Medical Center
  • UCLA Medical Center
  • Loma Linda University
  • Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
  • University of Southern California

Certifications & Licensure

  • American Board of Pediatrics-Pediatric Pulmonology
  • American Board of Allergy and Immunology-Allergy & Immunology
  • American Board of Internal Medicine-Internal Medicine
  • American Board of Pediatrics-Pediatrics
  • CA State Medical License

Awards, Honors, & Recognition

  • Breath of Life Award-CF Foundation, 2014
  • Teaching Attending of the Year-University of California Irvine, 2012
  • Outstanding Fellow of the Year (teaching award)-University of California Irvine, 2008-2009
  • Resident of the Year-Loma Linda University Medical Center, 2005
  • National Merit Scholar-University of Southern California
  • Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholar-University of Southern California
  • Trustee Scholar-University of Southern California

 
SELECTED Q&A ABOUT DR. RANDHAWA AND HIS OIT WORK. READ MORE HERE

Why is Dr. Randhawa’s OIT protocol unique?

Many OIT programs complete therapy when patients reach a goal dose of a food allergen. Those goal doses differ from program to program. For example, some OIT patients reach a “graduating” dose of 400 mg of peanut (the equivalent of 1 peanut). These patients maintain this dose daily but cannot eat more than one peanut daily. This provides “bite proof” protection but does not provide larger safety from anaphylaxis. Other programs aim for a goal dose of 4000 mg peanut (roughly 8-10 peanuts) given daily or three times a week. Although this dose provides some treatment benefit, it does not provide larger safety from anaphylaxis.

Dr. Randhawa’s program achieves a substantially higher maintenance dose, typically given weekly. In addition, the patient is free to eat a normal U.S. dietary intake of the allergic food involved. This larger maintenance dose provides a larger safety net from anaphylaxis while still achieving the treatment effect of food immunotherapy. Importantly, you may be free to enjoy foods and experiences that previously had been off-limits.

What is Dr. Randhawa’s protocol for OIT treatment?

Dr. Randhawa’s treatment protocol is unique and customized depending on the needs of each of his patients. Some of the features of his protocol are:

  • The goal of Dr. Randhawa’s treatment protocol is “dietary tolerance,” allowing patients to safely eat a normal dietary intake of the specific food allergen without being at risk for a reaction. Once this clinical milestone is achieved, the long-term strategy is to induce immunological tolerance to the allergic foods by continued dietary intake over years of time.
  • Randhawa utilizes uniquely comprehensive and cutting-edge diagnostic tools including comprehensive skin testing, patch testing, component resolved diagnostics, gastrointestinal testing, immune system diagnostics, and lung function analysis. Each patient receives a detailed and customized diagnosis and a specific, unique protocol of treatment.
  • The Food Allergy Center is a clinic physically located in Miller Children’s Hospital. This hospital-based setting allows for maximum safety. All patients are monitored utilizing cardiac, respiratory and telemetry monitoring during food dosing and challenges. A staff including an RN, respiratory therapist, and physician are on hand at all times during treatment. Safety is the hallmark of this program with over 6,000 successful food challenges completed.
  • Joint support of the program by Miller Children’s Hospital and the Gallegos family’s generous donation affords access to all patients, with minimal to no out-of-pocket cost. The alliance creates a medical home for food allergy patients between 6 months to 21 years of age.

Will I graduate from Dr. Randhawa’s program?

Since its inception, Dr. Randhawa has treated more than 450 patients with food immunotherapy at the Food Allergy CenterSince its inception, Dr. Randhawa has treated more than 450 patients with food immunotherapy at the Food Allergy Center. TPIRC doctors have nearly a decade of experience in OIT and have achieved an unmatched 99% success rate. Its nearly 1,000 OIT patients have achieved larger maintenance doses than those following other protocols, including more than 300 peanut graduates safely eating at least 60 peanuts daily. Patients whose peanut tolerance was less than 1/100 of a peanut prior to treatment now safely ingest peanuts without restriction. Dr. Randhawa also has successfully treated patients with allergy to milk, eggs, wheat, soy, tree nuts, seeds, fish and shellfish.

The following table summarizes some key differences among food allergy programs nationally, and why Dr. Randhawa’s approach is so successful:

Typical ClinicalTrial Setting Typical Private Practice Setting Dr. Randhawa and the Food Allergy Center
Safety of Setting Research facility; treatment conducted by non-M.D.s Typically in an office setting; treatment conducted by non-M.D.s Clinic within a hospital with doctors, RNs, and other specialists on staff; all challenges overseen by Dr. Randhawa; emergency facilities on site
Risk of Adverse Reactions 2-5% require EpiPen during home dosing 2-5% require EpiPen during home dosing <1% require EpiPen during home dosing
Patient Access Limited, based on the conditions of the study Limited, based on practice approval policies and financial considerations Open
Cost Associated costs of travel and lodging Some are purely out-of-pocket; others bill insurance but associated therapy costs may not be fully covered, resulting in out-of-pocket expenses of $1,500-$2,000 per month Insurance billed with no additional therapy costs
Patient Restrictions Restricted by conditions of the study (i.e. age, severity of prior reactions, etc.) Restricted by practice policies (i.e. age, severity of prior reactions, diagnosis of asthma, etc.) None
Foods Treated Typically limited to one food (e.g. peanut only) Typically limited to peanut only, with some offering treatment for milk, egg, and a few tree nuts Treatment available for peanut, milk, eggs, wheat, soy, all tree nuts, seeds, fish and shellfish
Medication Use During Treatment Dependent on conditions of the trial, regardless of patient’s individual needs None Customized, strategic use of medications to reach dose goals while minimizing frequency and severity of reactions and side-effects during treatment
Success Rate 70-85% 50-80% 99%


What makes Dr. Randhawa’s protocol and experience unique in treating patients with food allergies?

Dr. Randhawa has board certifications in internal medicine, pediatrics, immunology, allergy and pulmonology. He holds two academic appointments at the University of California Irvine and UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Randhawa has published over 150 peer reviewed abstracts and articles spanning the fields of immunology, pulmonology and allergy. He is the program director and research coordinator of two nationally recognized training programs in allergy, immunology and pediatric pulmonology. Dr. Randhawa has served as primary investigator in over 25 clinical trials to date.

Dr. Randhawa gained interest in food allergy as a sub-investigator in one of the first studies conducted on food allergy utilizing omalizumab (trade name Xolair). While promising, the study was halted due to adverse effects from anaphylaxis. Then, in 2005, Dr. Randhawa witnessed a dramatic and unprecedented increase in the pediatric intensive care unit admission rate as a result of anaphylaxis. The negative outcomes from these clinical cases drove Dr. Randhawa to query where food allergy treatment was directed. After discussions with national leaders in immunology and allergy, Dr. Randhawa focused on studying food allergy treatment in the unique model of drug desensitization.

As part of the breadth of his specialties, Dr. Randhawa cares for lung transplant patients, many of whom have life-threatening allergies to essential drugs. In order to safely administer an indispensable drug to such a patient, Dr. Randhawa implements a patient-specific desensitization protocol that includes comprehensive analysis of the patient’s allergy risk factors, immune system status, a blockade of certain immune system targets, and deployment of the allergic drug to the patient. This invaluable experience has further informed Dr. Randhawa’s implementation of his food immunotherapy protocol.

If I graduate from Dr. Randhawa’s OIT program, what will it mean for me?
Dr. Randhawa’s program achieves a substantially higher maintenance dose, typically given weekly. In addition, you may be free to eat a normal U.S. dietary intake of the allergic food involved. This larger maintenance dose provides a larger safety net from anaphylaxis while still achieving the treatment effect of food immunotherapy. Importantly you may be free to enjoy foods and experiences that previously had been off-limits.

What does Dr. Randhawa’s food immunotherapy program aim to achieve in the future?
Food immunotherapy is in its infancy. The likelihood of clinical trials resulting in FDA approval for food immunotherapy is not promising. However, other research modalities have collected and published enough data to promote a clear and accelerated protocol to provide food allergy treatment to the millions of children at risk for anaphylaxis.

Dr. Randhawa believes that food immunotherapy treatment should be expeditiously studied to develop nationally published, recognized and accepted protocols to give more patients access to food immunotherapy. As a result, he is studying food allergy at the cellular, molecular and clinical level in order to categorize and individualize food allergy treatment. In addition, he is expanding the number of food immunotherapy patients that he is treating to over 1,000. This unprecedented number of treated patients combined with molecular data results will provide the rubric of developing such protocols. The development of these protocols will ensure greater success for more patients and a decreased risk of adverse events. Without the development of such protocols, access to food immunotherapy will continue to be highly restricted.

The Food Allergy Center’s primary goal is to maintain and grow the program to achieve its mission of providing food allergy treatment safely with a clear long term therapeutic benefit. As such, Dr. Randhawa has expanded his clinical team to include a triple board-certified immunologist-allergist in the Fall of 2015. The new physician will participate in the clinical care of food allergy patients and direct protocol development. He also will assist in development of clinical and translational food allergy research expansion. With years of outcome data now complete, a number of manuscripts will be published specific to food allergy treatment under Dr. Randhawa’s program in early 2016.

The second goal of the program is to focus on collaboration to advance the development of research protocols. Spearheaded by Dr. Randhawa, the Translational Pulmonary & Immunology Research Center (www.tpirc.org) will serve as a nonprofit hub of basic science research, clinical science research, and food allergy advocacy and support. Located in proximity to the Food Allergy Center at Miller Children’s Hospital, this center will house doctorate researchers, fellows in training and other local scientists interested in studying food allergy diagnostics and treatment. Further collaboration with local universities, institutes and pharmaceutical companies will assure a bright future for expeditious food allergy treatment for millions nationwide!

Read the rest of the OIT FAQs here

Contact

Dr. Interpal Randhawa
Long Beach Memorial
Miller Children’s Hospital
2801 Atlantic Avenue, Long Beach, CA 90806
(562) 490-9900
http://tpirc.org/food-allergy-treatment-faqs/

 

OIT Details

Doctor Name: Dr. Randhawa
State: California
Allergen: Peanut, Tree nuts, Milk, Egg, Soy, Sesame, Shellfish, Chickpea, Coconut....almost any food.
Treats single/multi allergens at once: Both options
Offers SLIT for food allergens: Yes

Additional Features:

Articles in Our Research & Learn Center

 

Map to Office(s)

 


Publications & Presentations

PubMed

 

Journal Articles

  • Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy: A 20 year review and Current Update Saeedian M and Randhawa I, Int Arch Allergy Immunol, 7/10/2014
  • Properdin deficiency-associated bronchiectasis Lee JX, Yusin JS, and Randhawa I, Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol, 6/1/2014
  • Diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in the kindred of an infant with CFTR-related metabolic syndrome: importance of follow-up that includes monitoring sweat chloride concentr… Williams SN1, Nussbaum E, Chin TW, Do PC, Singh KE, Randhawa I, Pediatr Pulmonol, 3/1/2014
  • Beta Blocker Management of Refractory Hemoptysis in Cystic Fibrosis: A Novel Treatment Approach Moua J, Nussbaum E, and Randhawa I, Ther Adv Respir Dis, 8/1/2013
  • Interleukin-10 Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokines of Cystic Fibrosis Airway Cells Do P, Kwong KYC, Nussbaum E, Chin T, Rehan V, and Randhawa I, Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology, 12/1/2012
  • High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in Pediatric Acute Hypoxemic Respiratory Failure: Disease-Specific Morbidity Survival Analysis Babbitt C, Cooper MC, Nussbaum E, Liao E, Levine GK, Randhawa I, Lung, 10/4/2012
  • Successful Management of Plastic Bronchitis in a Child Post Fontan: Case Report and Literature Review Do P, Randhawa I, Chin T, Parsapour K, and Nussbaum E, Lung, 3/20/2012
  • Novel Asthma Therapies: A Review Chopra P, Randhawa I, and Chin T, Current Drug Therapy, 3/1/2012
  • Antidepressants in chronic idiopathic urticarial Yasharpour M and Randhawa I, Allergy Asthma Proc, 11/1/2011
  • Clinical Efficacy of Omalizumab in an Elderly Veteran Population with Severe Asthma Verma P, Randhawa I, and Klaustermeyer W, Asthma and Allergy Proceedings, 9/1/2011
  • The persistent thrombus: Complications, diagnosis, and novel treatment intervention Moua J, Nussbaum E, Kim YS, Romansky SG, Becker AD, Randhawa IS, Pediatric Crit Care Med, 2/10/2011
  • Not all that wheezes is bronchial asthma Randhawa I and Nussbaum E, N Engl J Med, 7/1/2010
  • Medical versus Surgical Therapy in Chronic Rhinosinusitis Randhawa I, Hiyama L, Rafi A, and Klaustermeyer WB, Allergol Immunopathol, 9/1/2009
  • Cephalosporin induced Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis and subsequent Penicillin Drug Exanthem Lam AS, Randhawa I, and Klaustermeyer, WB, Allergology International, 7/1/2008
  • Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in a child with cartilage-hair hypoplasia syndrome Inderpal Randhawa, Donald Janner, Craig Zuppan, George Yanni, Hepatology Research, 1/1/2007
  • Ability to control persistent asthma in obese versus non-obese children enrolled in an asthma-specific disease management program (breathmobile) Kwong KY, Randhawa I, Saxena J, Morphew T, Jones CA, J Asthma, 11/1/2006
  • The Effects of IL-10 on Proinflammatory Cytokine Expression (IL-1 and IL-8) in Hyaline Membrane Disease (HMD) K.Y. Kwong, C.A. Jones, R. Cayabab, C. Lecart, N. Khuu, I. Randhawa, J.M. Hanley, R.A. deLemos, and P. Minoo, Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology, 1/1/1998
  • Differential Regulation of IL-8 by IL-1 and TNF in Hyaline Membrane Disease K.Y. Kwong, C.A. Jones, R. Cayabab, C. Lecart, C. Stotts, I. Randhawa, P. Minoo, and R.A. deLemos, Journal of Clinical Immunology, 1/1/1998
  • Oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma: a 30-year review Inderpal Randhawa and William B. Klaustermeyer, Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
  • Resolution of Corticosteroid Induced Diabetes in Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis with Omalizumab Therapy: A Novel Approach Randhawa I, Chin T, and Nussbaum E, Journal of Asthma

Abstracts/Posters

  • Tuberculous Mycobacteria in Cystic Fibrosis Patients: Is Therapy Really Warranted?Moua J, Do PC, Chin T, Randhawa I, Chen T, Michalik DE, Batra J, Edwards J, Nussbaum E, Pediatric Pulmonology; 25th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference, Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, CA, 11/1/2011
  • Possible Eventual Positive Sweat Chloride Test Results in Children With CFTR-Related Metabolic Syndrome (CRMS).Williams S, Chin T, Randhawa I, Nussbaum E, Pediatric Pulmonology, 25th Annual North American Cystic Fibrosis Conference, Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, CA, 11/1/2011
  • Correlation of clinical control and ADRB2 polymorphisms in geriatric COPD and Asthma.Randhawa I, Junaid I, and Klaustermeyer WB, ATS Conference, 1/1/2009
  • Clinical Efficacy of Omalizumab in an Elderly Veteran Population with Severe Asthma.Verma P, Randhawa I, and Klaustermeyer W, Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 1/1/2009
  • Safety of inhaled corticosteroids in HIV patients.Benouni S, Randhawa I, Ferdman R, and Church J, AAAAI Annual Meeting, 2/1/2007
  • Ion transport in the midgut and malpighian tubules.Sarjeet S. Gill, Patricia V. Pietrantonio, Linda S. Ross, Inderpal S. Randhawa, and Daniela Oltean, Keystone Proceedings, Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, 3/1/1995

Lectures

  • A Novel Approach to Asthma Inhaler Compliance Using Breath Measurement of Aerosol. San Diego, CA – 5/18/2014
  • 10 Year-Old Female With Chronic Cough. 5/1/2014
  • Experience with Bronchoscopy in Young Patients with CRMS and Cystic Fibrosis. Carmel, CA – 1/1/2014
  • Properdin Deficiency Associated Bronchiectasis. 12/1/2013
  • A Novel Protocol to Detect Impaired Ventilatory Response to Brief Exercise in Cystic Fibrosis. Chicago, IL – 11/1/2013
  • Cystic Fibrosis Patients at High Risk for Disease Progression Marked by Accelerated Decline in FEV1% predicted: Development and Validation of the CF RD-Pro Score. Long Beach, CA – 11/1/2013
  • Unusual Odds of Identical Genotype for Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Dysfunction in a Sibship of Eight. Phoenix, AZ – 3/22/2013
  • A Novel Scoring System In Cystic Fibrosis: Early Predictors of A 10% Fall In FEV1 – A Preliminary Report. 10/1/2012
  • Beta-Blocker Management of Refractory Hemoptysis In Cystic Fibrosis: A Novel Treatment Approach. 10/1/2012
  • Progression And Prognostic Indicators of Bronchial And Alveolar Disease In Children With Sickle Cell Disease. San Francisco, CA – 5/23/2012
  • Interleukin-10 Suppresses Inflammatory Cytokines of Cystic Fibrosis Airway Cells. Anaheim Convention Center, Anaheim, CA – 11/1/2011
  • Possible Eventual Positive Sweat Chloride Test Results in Children With CFTR-Related Metabolic Syndrome (CRMS). Honolulu, HI – 10/23/2011
  • Successful Management of Plastic Bronchitis in a Child with post Fontan Procedure. Denver, CO – 5/1/2011
  • Inhibition of Constitutive IL-8 Expression in Vitro Lung Inflammatory Cells from Pediatric Patients with Cystic Fibrosis. San Francisco, CA – 2/1/2011
  • Effect of Interleukin-10 (IL-10) on Lung Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis. San Francisco, CA – 2/1/2011
  • Cartilage Hair Hypoplasia Syndrome: A Pediatric Case Report of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Liver Failure. 3/1/2006
  • Production and Characterization of the Ovalbumin IL-18 Fusion Protein, 6/98- 8/98. 9/1/2000

 

Other

  • Characterization of the Expression of the IL-10 gene in Transfected 3T3 Fibroblasts. C.A. Jones and I. Randhawa, Honors thesis dissertation at the University of Southern California 2/1/1997

 

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